Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) Self-Regulatory Program

Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) Self-Regulatory Program

Latest News:Digital Advertising Alliance Launches Initiative to Increase Transparency & Accountability in Political Ads

The Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) today launched an industry-wide initiative to increase transparency and accountability around digital political ads, including new guidance for political advertisers and a PoliticalAd icon that will link to additional information on such ads. Compliance with the guidance will be independently enforced by the Advertising Self Regulatory Council (ASRC) and the Data & Marketing Association (DMA).Read the press release here.

The Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) establishes and enforces responsible privacy practices across industry for relevant digital advertising, providing consumers with enhanced transparency and control through multifacetedPrinciplesthat apply to Multi-Site Data and Cross-App Data gathered in either desktop or mobile environments. The DAA is an independent non-profitorganization led byleading advertising and marketing trade associations.

Learn about Interest-Based Advertising (IBA):Find out moreabout interest-based advertising and how it helps provide you with more relevant advertising on the websites you visit or applications you use. Youll learn how IBAsupports the free content, products and services you use online, and what choices are provided to you through the DAA Program.

Exercise Your Choice:Visitthe DAAs Consumer Choice page, which allows users to conveniently opt out from Choice Page participating companies collection of Web viewing data over time and across unaffiliated sites for IBA and other applicable uses under the Principles.

Report a Complaint:If you believe that you have witnessed a practice or ad may violate the Principles, you canreport the incidentto either Better Business Bureaus (CBBB) or The Direct Marketing Association (DMA). Complaints may be filed by consumers, business entities or other stakeholders.

Learn about the DAA Program:You can find out more about the DAAPrinciples, and our participatingAssociations. To learn how your company can implement the Principles, please review theImplementation Resources.

Register to USE the DAA Icon:Companies participating in Program may use the DAA Icon as a means for providing enhanced notice of interest-based advertising practices. If you would like to register to use the icon, pleaseclick here.here. To separately register your company participate in the DAAs AppChoices tool, pleaseclick here.

Report a Complaint:If you believe that you have witnessed a practice or ad that may violate the Principles, you canreport the incidentto incident to either Better Business Bureaus (CBBB) or The Direct Marketing Association (DMA). Complaints may be filed by consumers, business entities or other stakeholders.

For Companies Engaged in Online Behavioral Advertising

To enhance the transparency of interest-based advertising, the DAA encourages companies qualifying as third parties under the Principles to:

about their data practices through clear, meaningful and prominent notices.

so Icon so that consumers find out about interest-based advertising, learn about the data practices associated with advertisements they receive, and opt-out if they choose.

to receive information about how to be listed on the

, where consumers will be able to easily opt out from data collection by participating companies for applicable practices

The Living Room Candidate

Donald Trumps Argument for America

Donald Trump: Our movement is about replacing a failed and corrupt political establishment with a new government controlled by you, the American people. The establishment has trillions of dollars at stake in this election. For those who control the levers of power in Washington and for the global special interests, they partner with these people that dont have your good in mind. The political establishment, that is trying to stop us, is the same group responsible for our disastrous trade deals, massive illegal immigration, and economic and foreign policies that have bled our country dry. The political establishment has brought about the destruction of our factories and our jobs as they flee to Mexico, China, and other countries all around the world. Its a global power structure that is responsible for the economic decisions that have robbed our working class, stripped our country of its wealth, and put that money into the pockets of a handful of large corporations and political entities. The only thing that can stop this corrupt machine is you. The only force strong enough to save our country is us. The only people brave enough to vote out this corrupt establishment is you, the American people. Im doing this for the people and for the movement and we will take back this country for you and we will make America great again.

Donald Trumps Argument for America, Trump, 2016

From Museum of the Moving Image,The Living Room Candidate: Presidential Campaign Commercials 1952-2012.

To link to or forward this video via email, copy and

To embed this video in a web page, copy and

This closing ad for Donald Trump effectively summarized the anti-establishment message of his campaign.

VIEW ADS FROM THE CURRENT ELECTION.

A BLOGABOUT THE 2016 CLINTON VS. TRUMP ELECTION,UPDATED DAILY.

The idea that you can merchandise candidates for high office like breakfast cereal is the ultimate indignity to the democratic process.

-Democratic candidate Adlai Stevenson, 1956

Television is no gimmick, and nobody will ever be elected to major office again without presenting themselves well on it.

-Television producer and Nixon campaign consultant Roger Ailes, 1968

In a media-saturated environment in which news, opinions, and entertainment surround us all day on our television sets, computers, and cell phones, the television commercial remains the one area where presidential candidates have complete control over their images. Television commercials use all the tools of fiction filmmaking, including script, visuals, editing, and performance, to distill a candidates major campaign themes into a few powerful images. Ads elicit emotional reactions, inspiring support for a candidate or raising doubts about his opponent. While commercials reflect the styles and techniques of the times in which they were made, the fundamental strategies and messages have tended to remain the same over the years.

The Living Room Candidatecontains more than 300 commercials, from every presidential election since 1952, when Madison Avenue advertising executive Rosser Reeves convinced Dwight Eisenhower that short ads played during such popular TV programs asI Love Lucywould reach more voters than any other form of advertising. This innovation had a permanent effect on the way presidential campaigns are run.

Dozens of Companies Are Using Facebook to Exclude Older

Dozens of Companies Are Using Facebook to Exclude Older Workers From Job Ads

Among the companies we found doing it: Amazon, Verizon, UPS and Facebook itself. Its blatantly unlawful, said one employment law expert.

byJulia Angwin, ProPublica,Noam Scheiber,The New York Times, andAriana Tobin, ProPublica

Mark Edelstein, a social media marketing strategist who is also legally blind, says he never had serious trouble finding a job until he turned 50.

(Whitney Curtis for The New York Times)

This story was co-published with The New York Times.

A few weeks ago, Verizon placed an ad on Facebook to recruit applicants for a unit focused on financial planning and analysis. The ad showed a smiling, millennial-aged woman seated at a computer and promised that new hires could look forward to a rewarding career in which they would be more than just a number.

Some relevant numbers were not immediately evident. The promotion was set to run on the Facebook feeds of users 25 to 36 years old who lived in the nations capital, or had recently visited there, and had demonstrated an interest in finance. For a vast majority of the hundreds of millions of people who check Facebook every day, the ad did not exist.

This Verizon recruiting ad appeared on Facebook last month, seeking financial analysts aged 25 to 36. Verizon didnt respond to repeated requests for comment about this ad.

Verizonis among dozens of the nations leading employers includingAmazon,Goldman Sachs,TargetandFacebookitself that placed recruitment ads limited to particular age groups, an investigation by ProPublica and The New York Times has found.

The ability of advertisers to deliver their message to the precise audience most likely to respond is the cornerstone of Facebooks business model. But using the system to expose job opportunities only to certain age groups has raised concerns about fairness to older workers.

Several experts questioned whether the practice is in keeping with the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, which prohibits bias against people 40 or older in hiring or employment. Many jurisdictions make it a crime to aid or abet age discrimination, a provision that could apply to companies like Facebook that distribute job ads.

Its blatantly unlawful, said Debra Katz, a Washington employment lawyer who represents victims of discrimination.

Facebookdefended the practice. Used responsibly, age-based targeting for employment purposes is an accepted industry practice and for good reason: it helps employers recruit and people of all ages find work, said Rob Goldman, a Facebook vice president.

The revelations come at a time when the unregulated power of the tech companies is under increased scrutiny, and Congress is weighing whether to limit the immunity that it granted to tech companies in 1996 for third-party content on their platforms.

Facebook has argued in court filings that the law, the Communications Decency Act, makes it immune from liability for discriminatory ads.

These Are the Job Ads You Cant See on Facebook If Youre Older

It is against the law to discriminate against workers older than 40 in hiring and recruitment. We found dozens of companies who bought Facebook ads aimed at recruiting workers within limited age ranges.

Although Facebook is a relatively new entrant into the recruiting arena, it is rapidly gaining popularity with employers. Earlier this year, the social network launched asection of its site devoted to job ads. Facebook allows advertisers to select their audience, and then Facebook finds the chosen users with the extensive data it collects about its members.

The use of age targets emerged in a review of data originally compiled by ProPublica readers for aproject about political ad placementon Facebook. Many of the ads include a disclosure by Facebook about why the user is seeing the ad, which can be anything from their age to their affinity for folk music.

The precision of Facebooks ad delivery has helped it dominate an industry once in the hands of print and broadcast outlets. The system, called microtargeting, allows advertisers to reach essentially whomever they prefer, including the people their analysis suggests are the most plausible hires or consumers, lowering the costs and vastly increasing efficiency.

Targeted Facebook ads were an important tool in Russias efforts to influence the 2016 election. The social media giant has acknowledged that126 million peoplesaw Russia-linked content, some of which was aimed at particular demographic groups and regions. Facebook has also come under criticism for the disclosure that it accepted ads aimed at Jew-haters as well ashousing adsthat discriminated by race, gender, disability and other factors.

Other tech companies also offer employers opportunities to discriminate by age. ProPublica bought job ads on Google and LinkedIn that excluded audiences older than 40 and the ads were instantly approved. Google said it does not prevent advertisers from displaying ads based on the users age. After being contacted by ProPublica, LinkedIn changed its system to prevent such targeting in employment ads.

The practice has begun to attract legal challenges. On Wednesday, a class-action complaint alleging age discrimination wasfiled in federal courtin San Francisco on behalf of the Communications Workers of America and its members as well as all Facebook users 40 or older who may have been denied the chance to learn about job openings. The plaintiffs lawyers said the complaint was based on ads for dozens of companies that they had discovered on Facebook.

The database of Facebook ads collected by ProPublica shows how often and precisely employers recruit by age. In a search for part-time package handlers, United Parcel Service ran an ad aimed at people 18 to 24.State Farmpitched its hiring promotion to those 19 to 35.

Some companies, including Target, State Farm and UPS, defended their targeting as a part of a broader recruitment strategy that reached candidates of all ages. The group of companies making this case included Facebook itself, which ran career ads on its own platform, many aimed at people 25 to 60. We completely reject the allegation that these advertisements are discriminatory, said Goldman of Facebook.

After being contacted by ProPublica and the Times, other employers, including Amazon,Northwestern Mutualand theNew York City Department of Education, said they had changed or were changing their recruiting strategies.

You can download the Facebook Political Ad Collector from theChrome Web Storeor theMozilla Add-ons Store.

We recently audited our recruiting ads on Facebook and discovered some had targeting that was inconsistent with our approach of searching for any candidate over the age of 18, said Nina Lindsey, a spokeswoman for Amazon, which targeted some ads for workers at its distribution centers between the ages of 18 and 50. We have corrected those ads.

Verizon did not respond to requests for comment.

Several companies argued that targeted recruiting on Facebook was comparable to advertising opportunities in publications like the AARP magazine or Teen Vogue, which are aimed at particular age groups. But this obscures an important distinction. Anyone can buy Teen Vogue and see an ad. Online, however, people outside the targeted age groups can be excluded in ways they will never learn about.

What happens with Facebook is you dont know what you dont know, said David Lopez, a former general counsel for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission who is one of the lawyers at the firm Outten & Golden bringing the age-discrimination case on behalf of the communication workers union.

Age discrimination on digital platforms is something that many workers suspect is happening to them, but that is often difficult to prove.

Mark Edelstein, a fitfully employed social-media marketing strategist who is 58 and legally blind, doesnt pretend to know what he doesnt know, but he has his suspicions.

Edelstein, who lives in St. Louis, says he never had serious trouble finding a job until he turned 50. Once you reach your 50s, you may as well be dead, he said. Ive gone into interviews, with my head of gray hair and my receding hairline, and they know Im dead.

This HubSpot ad aimed at people aged 27 to 40 appeared on Facebook in November. The company said that this ad was a mistake and that the company would not use the age-targeting feature again.

Edelstein spends most of his days scouring sites like LinkedIn and Indeed and pitching hiring managers with personalized appeals. When he scrolled through his Facebook ads on a Wednesday in December, he saw a variety of ads reflecting his interest in social media marketing: ads for the marketing softwareHubSpot(15 free infographic templates!) and TripIt, which he used to book a trip to visit his mother in Florida.

What he didnt see was a single ad for a job in his profession, including one identified by ProPublica that was being shown to younger users: a posting for asocial media director job at HubSpot. The company asked that the ad be shown to people aged 27 to 40 who live or were recently living in the United States.

Hypothetically, had I seen a job for a social media director at HubSpot, even if it involved relocation, I ABSOLUTELY would have applied for it, Edelstein said by email when told about the ad.

A HubSpot spokeswoman, Ellie Botelho, said that the job was posted on many sites, including LinkedIn, The Ladders and Built in Boston, and was open to anyone meeting the qualifications regardless of age or any other demographic characteristic.

She added that the use of the targeted age-range selection on the Facebook ad was frankly a mistake on our part given our lack of experience using that platform for job postings and not a feature we will use again.

For his part, Edelstein says he understands why marketers wouldnt want to target ads at him: It doesnt surprise me a bit. Why would they want a 58-year-old white guy whos disabled?

Although LinkedIn is the leading online recruitment platform, according toan annualsurvey by SourceCon, an industry website. Facebook is rapidly increasing in popularity for employers.

One reason is that Facebooks sheer size two billion monthly active users, versus LinkedIns 530 million total members gives recruiters access to types of workers they cant find elsewhere.

Consider nurses, whom hospitals are desperate to hire. Theyre less likely to use LinkedIn, said Josh Rock, a recruiter at a large hospital system in Minnesota who has expertise in digital media. Nurses are predominantly female, theres a larger volume of Facebook users. Thats what they use.

There are also millions of hourly workers who have never visited LinkedIn, and may not even have a rsum, but who check Facebook obsessively.

This Facebook recruiting ad appeared on the social network in October, targeting people aged 25 to 60. The company defends its use of age-targeting as part of a broader recruitment strategy.

Deb Andrychuk, chief executive of the Arland Group, which helps employers place recruitment ads, said clients sometimes asked her firm to target ads by age, saying they needed to start bringing younger blood into their organizations. Its not necessarily that we wouldnt take someone older, these clients say, according to Andrychuk, but if you could bring in a younger set of applicants, it would definitely work out better.

Andrychuk said that we coach clients to be open and not discriminate and that after being contacted by The Times, her team updated all their ads to ensure they didnt exclude any age groups.

But some companies contend that there are permissible reasons to filter audiences by age, as with an ad for entry-level analyst positions at Goldman Sachs that was distributed to people 18 to 64. A Goldman Sachs spokesman, Andrew Williams, said showing it to people above that age range would have wasted money: roughly 25 percent of those who typically click on the firms untargeted ads are 65 or older, but people that age almost never apply for the analyst job.

We welcome and actively recruit applicants of all ages, Williams said. For some of our social-media ads, we look to get the content to the people most likely to be interested, but do not exclude anyone from our recruiting activity.

Pauline Kim, a professor of employment law at Washington University in St. Louis, said the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, unlike the federal anti-discrimination statute that covers race and gender, allows an employer to take into account reasonable factors that may be highly correlated with the protected characteristic, such as cost, as long as they dont rely on the characteristic explicitly.

In various ways, Facebook and LinkedIn have acknowledged at least a modest obligation to police their ad platforms against abuse.

Earlier this year, Facebook said it would require advertisers to self-certify that their housing, employment and credit ads were compliant with anti-discrimination laws, but that it would not block marketers from purchasing age-restricted ads.

Still, Facebook didnt promise to monitor those certifications for accuracy. And Facebook said the self-certification system, announced in February, was still being rolled out to all advertisers.

This Amazon recruiting ad appeared on Facebook in November, aimed at people aged 18 to 50. The company said it has corrected the ads and is changing its recruiting strategy.

LinkedIn, in response to inquiries by ProPublica, added a self-certification step that prevents employers from using age ranges when placing an employment ad, unless they affirm the ad is not discriminatory.

With these efforts evolving, legal experts say it is unclear how much liability the tech platforms could have. Some civil rights laws, like the Fair Housing Act, explicitly require publishers to assume liability for discriminatory ads.

But the Age Discrimination in Employment Act assigns liability only to employers or employment agencies, like recruiters and advertising firms.

The lawsuit filed against Facebook on behalf of the communications workers argues that the company essentially plays the role of an employment agency collecting and providing data that helps employers locate candidates, effectively coordinating with the employer to develop the advertising strategies, informing employers about the performance of the ads, and so forth.

Regardless of whether courts accept that argument, the tech companies could also face liability under certain state or local anti-discrimination statutes. For example, Californias Fair Employment and Housing Act makes it unlawful to aid, abet, incite, compel or coerce the doing of discriminatory acts proscribed by the statute.

They may have an obligation there not to aid and abet an ad that enables discrimination, said Cliff Palefsky, an employment lawyer based in San Francisco.

The question may hinge on Section 230 of the federal Communications Decency Act, which protects internet companies from liability for third-party content.

Tech companies have successfully invoked this law to avoid liability for offensive or criminal content includingsex trafficking,revenge pornandcalls for violence against Jews. Facebook iscurrently arguingin federal court that Section 230 immunizes it against liability for ad placement that blocks members of certain racial and ethnic groups from seeing the ads.

Advertisers, not Facebook, are responsible for both the content of their ads and what targeting criteria to use, if any, Facebook argued in itsmotion to dismissallegations that its ads violated a host of civil rights laws. The case does not allege age discrimination.

Over 50 and Looking for a Job? We Want to Hear From You

We know American employers dont always treat older workers fairly. We need your help figuring out what that looks like.

Eric Goldman, professor and co-director of the High Tech Law Institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law, who has written extensively about Section 230, says it is hard to predict how courts would treat Facebooks age-targeting of employment ads.

Goldman said the law covered the content of ads, and that courts have made clear that Facebook would not be liable for an advertisement in which an employer wrote, say, no one over 55 need apply. But it is not clear how the courts would treat Facebooks offering of age-targeted customization.

According to a federal appellate court decision in afair-housing case, a platform can be considered to have helped develop unlawful content that users play a role in generating, which would negate the immunity.

Depending on how the targeting is happening, you can make potentially different sorts of arguments about whether or not Google or Facebook or LinkedIn is contributing to the development of the ad, said Deirdre K. Mulligan, a faculty director of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology.

Jeff Larson and Madeleine Varner contributed research.

Want to help monitor ads on Facebook? Download our tool forFirefoxorChromeweb browsers.

Julia Angwin is a senior reporter at ProPublica. From 2000 to 2013, she was a reporter at The Wall Street Journal, where she led a privacy investigative team that was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting in 2011 and won a Gerald Loeb Award in 2010.

Ariana is an engagement reporter at ProPublica, where she works to cultivate communities to inform our coverage.

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The J. M. Smucker Company is an Equal Opportunity Employer. No person will be discriminated against in any aspect of his or her employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, transgender status, marital status, familial status, disability, genetic information, protected veteran/military status, or any other characteristic protected by applicable federal, state, or local law.

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We or vendors we have hired use several common tracking technologies. These may include browser and flash cookies, web beacons, and similar technologies. These technologies are used to track our consumers and website visitors, including for the following reasons:

To track new visitors to our websites.

To determine if you have opened an email message we sent to you.

To store your password if you are registered on our website.

To serve you with advertising content in which we think you will be interested. As part of this customization, we may observe your behaviors on this website or on other websites. We may also get information about your browsing history from our trusted business partners.

So we can better understand our audience, our customers, our website visitors, and their respective interests.

You may control our use of cookies. How you do so depends on the type of cookie. You can configure your browser to reject browser cookies. To control flash cookies, clickhere. Why? Because flash cookies do not reside in your browser, and thus your browser settings will not affect them. If you configure your computer to block cookies, you may not be able to access certain functionality on our Site.

We may also work with online advertising companies to provide you with advertising on this website, or other websites that you visit. These ads may be based on information you submit on our website or third party sites. It may also be based on your activities or behaviors on our websites or on third party sites. We may use gathered information to serve you with advertisements on our websites or on third party websites.

We work with third parties to help us with the online tracking. All such parties participate in the Self-Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral Advertising. This program allows consumers to opt-out of having their online behavior tracked for advertising purposes. If you want to opt out, clickhere.

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We collect personal information about users over time and across different websites, apps and devices when you use this website or service. Third parties also collect personal information this way on our sites and services. To do this, we use several common tracking tools. Our vendors and partners may also use these tools. These may include browser cookies. We, or our vendors and partners, may also use web beacons, flash cookies, and other tracking technologies.

We use tracking technologies for a variety of reasons.We and our partners use tracking tools:

To recognize new or past customers. To store your password if you have registered on our site. To improve our website and provide you with a better brand experience To serve you with interest-based or targeted advertising (see below for more on interest-based advertising). To observe your behaviors and browsing activities over time across multiple websites or other platforms. To better understand the interests of our website visitors.

We engage in interest-based advertising.We and our partners display interest-based advertising using information gathered about you over time across multiple websites, devices, or other platforms. This might include apps.

Interest-based advertising or online behavioral advertising includes ads served to you after you leave a website, encouraging you to return. These ads may be served after you leave our website, or after you leave the websites of third parties. They also include ads we and our partners think are relevant based on your browsing habits or online activities. These ads might be served on websites. We might serve these ads, or third parties may serve ads. They might be about our products or other companies products.

How do we gather relevant information about you for interest-based advertising?To decide what is relevant to you, we and our partners use information you make available when you interact with us, our affiliates, and other third parties. This information is gathered using the tracking tools described above. For example, we or our partners might look at your purchases or browsing behaviors. We and our partners might look at these activities on our platforms or the platforms of others.

We work with third parties who help gather this information. These third parties might link your name or email address to other information they collect. That might include past purchases made offline or online. Or, it might include online usage information.

You can control certain tracking tools.Your browser may give you the ability to control cookies. How you do so depends on the type of cookie. Certain browsers can be set to reject browser cookies. To control flash cookies, which we may use on certain websites from time to time, you can gohere. Why? Because flash cookies cannot be controlled through your browser settings.

Our Do Not Track Policy: Some browsers have do not track features that allow you to tell a website not to track you. These features are not all uniform. We do not currently respond to those signals. If you block cookies, certain features on our sites may not work. If you block or reject cookies, not all of the tracking described here will stop.

Certain options you select are browser and device specific.

You can opt-out of behavioral advertising.TheSelf-Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral Advertisingprogram provides consumers with the ability to opt-out of having their online behavior recorded and used for advertising purposes. To opt out of having your online behavior collected for advertising purposes, clickhere.

Some of the tracking technologies we may use do not participate in theSelf-Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral Advertising. You can click on the name of each tracker to get more information about how to opt-out of that trackers cookies:AMP PlatformAppNexusDiligantKenshooMartini MediaSharethroughSiteScoutSpotXchangeTremor MediaTwitterandXaxis.

TheDigital Advertising Alliancealso offers a tool for opting out of the collection of cross-app data on a mobile device for interest-based advertising. To exercise choices for the companies participating in this tool, download theAppChoicesapphere.

Certain choices you make are both browser and device-specific.

Maybelline x Gigi Hadid West Coast Collection Lipick

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Search for items, brands and inspiration

Maybelline x Gigi Hadid West Coast Collection Lipstick

Maybelline x Gigi Hadid West Coast Collection Lipstick

Designed in collaboration with Gigi Hadid

Highly-pigmented and long-lasting colour

is the number one global cosmetics brand. Born in 1915 with a catchy slogan to match,

now offers over 200 beauty products and champions cosmopolitan city-girl style. Concocted by an American chemist on behalf of his older sister, Maybel, the brand has since gone on to become a cosmetics staple for women all over the world.

Maybelline x Gigi Hadid West Coast Collection Lipstick

Shop Maybelline x Gigi Hadid West Coast Collection Lipstick at ASOS. Discover fashion online.

ASOS MATERNITY Denim Side Splithorts in Phoebe Wash

ASOS uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue we assume that you consent to receive all cookies on all ASOS websites.Read More

To use ASOS, we recommend using the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari or Internet Explorer

Search for items, brands and inspiration

ASOS MATERNITY Denim Side Split Shorts in Phoebe Wash

ASOS MATERNITY Denim Side Split Shorts in Phoebe Wash

Supports Cotton made in Africa (CmiA)s sustainable farming

Stretch jersey waistband to support your growing bump

Designed to fit through all stages of pregnancy

Our model wears a UK 8/EU 36/US 4 and is 178cm/510 tall

Maternity dressing gets bumped up to next-level status with the

edit. Designed by the London-based team to fit you from three months onwards, you can grow your wardrobe alongside your bump with maternity clothes in (UK) sizes 6-20, with adjustable fastenings and flexible waistbands. Tick all of your pre- and post-baby boxes with its jersey basics, nursing bras, dresses, denim and outerwear that all get the bump-friendly treatment.

Machine Wash According To Instructions On Care Label

ASOS MATERNITY Denim Side Split Shorts in Phoebe Wash

Shop ASOS MATERNITY Denim Side Split Shorts in Phoebe Wash at ASOS. Discover fashion online.